DebConf8 Travel Sponsorship
on 26.05.2008, 23:49
in debconf-news
Debian Weekly News 2008/03
on 26.05.2008, 00:00
in weekly-news
potrace: Transform bitmap images into vector graphics
on 19.05.2008, 05:00
in packages-news
Debian Weekly News 2008/02
on 09.05.2008, 00:00
in weekly-news
cu: Simple serial communication program
on 04.05.2008, 05:00
in packages-news
Thanks!
on 03.05.2008, 05:26
in packages-news

DebConf8 Travel Sponsorship

published on Mon May 26 23:49:00 2008 in debconf-news

I finally sent out a flood of mails to those people that applied for Travel Sponsorship for this years Debian Conference in Argentina. We have 58 people who got a position in our sponsorship queue, asking for nearly 60.000 USD in total. We are not yet sure if we are able to reimburse all of them, but we will at least try to.

We also have 24 people rejected from this queue and possibly some people haven’t been able to fill out their settings in our conference management system correctly/in time. While we are sorry for them, we can’t do much here.

Debian Weekly News 2008/03

published on Mon May 26 00:00:00 2008 in weekly-news

Welcome to this year's 3rd issue of DPN, the newsletter for the Debian community. Steve McIntyre sent a new Bits from the DPL mail. A serious issue in Debians OpenSSL package has been fixed recently. Debian is discussing an archive strucure for huge packages.

Bits from the Debian Project Leader

Steve McIntyre sent a new release of his Bits from the DPL reporting his recent activities as elected Project Leader. He starts by pointing to several interviews he gave recently and continues by informing about personal changes in core teams. Jonathan McDowell has been added as keyring maintainer, and is already working together with James Troup on easier integration of keyring maintenance and our ldap system for better cooperation with the Debian System Administrators. He thanks Anthony Towns, who stepped down from the teams he was in.

OpenSSL weakness in Debian affecting many other packages

Luciano Bello discovered that the random number generator in Debian's openssl package is predictable. This is caused by an incorrect Debian-specific change to the openssl package (CVE-2008-0166). As a result, cryptographic key material may be guessable. Affected keys include SSH keys, OpenVPN keys, DNSSEC keys, and key material for use in X.509 certificates and session keys used in SSL/TLS connections. Keys generated with GnuPG or GNUTLS are not affected, though. However, other systems can be indirectly affected if weak keys are imported into them.

Perl 5.10 Transition

Marc Brockschmidt announced the completion of the recently ongoing transition to Perl 5.10 as default version for the upcoming stable release.

Backports.org unknown?

During his triage of older bugs reported against OpenOffice.org, Lior Kaplan noticed, that many users are not aware of backports.org, an unofficial service providing updated packages for users of the stable version of Debian.

Huge Packages in Debian

Members of the Debian Games Team (and other maintainers of generic large data packages) wondered about size limitations of the Debian archive (and its infrastructure) regarding packages. Joerg Jaspert joined the discussion as ftp-master and summarized the possibilities to solve the issues. He's favouring to create a new archive for large packages (containing architecture independent data) and if possible a change of the Debian Policy allowing packages depending on such data only available in the new archive to stay in main.

State of SANE

Since SANE (scanner access now easy, a framework for accessing scanners) is working on improving its interface, Julien Blache gave an overview on his plans for the SANE packages for the upcoming release, Lenny. Sane will need so stay on the current interface, but Julien plans to backport some important improvements from the development branch and asks for some feedback.

Hints for new Free Software Projects

Francois Marier gave hints on how to choose a license for free software projects. He concludes that using a license incompatible with mainstream licenses like the GNU General Public License is as bad as writing an own license.

Other News

Sven Joachim wondered about the state of translation packages for enigmail, a GnuPG tool for the mail client Icedove. Alexander Sack replied, that he will add them to the main package.

Debian Project will be at Linux Tag 2008

From Wednesday the 28th of May 2008 to Saturday the 31st of May 2008, Berlin, Germany, Debian Project will participate with a booth at Linux Tag 2008. Please see our events page for further details.

Work-needing packages

Currently 433 packages are orphaned and 104 packages are up for adoption. Please take a look at the recent reports if there are packages you are interested in.

Want to continue reading DPN?

Please help us create this newsletter. We still need more volunteer writers who watch the Debian community and report about what is going on. Please see our HOWTO contribute page to find out how to help. We're looking forward to receiving your mail at debian-publicity@lists.debian.org.

mhddfs: join several real filesystems together to form a single larger one

published on Sun May 25 05:00:32 2008 in packages-news

Article submitted by Roman Mamedov. Guess what? We still need you to submit good articles about software you like!

Suppose, you have three hard drives - sized 80, 40 and 60 GB. And 150 GB of music files, which you need to store on these drives. How would you do it?

The two solutions I knew of, were:

  • either to simply have three separate «Music» folders - one per each drive;
  • or create some sort of RAID, joining all the drives into an array.

However, the first method is quite tiresome, as one needs to decide how to split the data between the drives and keep track of what is stored where. For example, I might decide to store all «Classical» music on the first disk, and «Rock» music on the second. Then, suddenly, the first drive fills up and the second one still has plenty of space. Now I need to move the files between the disks, or jump around with symlinks.

The RAID method, while solving this problem, always incurs significant loss of either storage reliability or usable disk space.

But recently, I found a better solution to this problem and similar ones: mhddfs. It is a FUSE filesystem module which allows to combine several smaller filesystems into one big «virtual» one, which will contain all the files from all its members, and all their free space. Even better, unlike other similar modules (unionfs?), this one does not limit the ability to add new files on the combined filesystem and intelligently manages, where those files will be placed.

The package is called «mhddfs» and is currently present in Debian Testing and Unstable. It does not seem to be available in Ubuntu at the moment.

Let's say the three hard drives you have are mounted at /mnt/hdd1 /mnt/hdd2 and /mnt/hdd3. Then, you might have something akin to the following:

$ df -h
Filesystem            Size  Used Avail Use% Mounted on
...
/dev/sda1              80G   50G   30G  63% /mnt/hdd1
/dev/sdb1              40G   35G    5G  88% /mnt/hdd2
/dev/sdc1              60G   10G   50G  17% /mnt/hdd3

After you have installed the mhddfs package using your favourite package manager, you can create a new mount point, let's call it /mnt/virtual, which will join all these drives together for you. The beauty of FUSE means you don't really have to be root for this (can be just a member of the fuse group), but for the sake of examples' simplicity, let's suppose we are logged in as root here.

# mkdir /mnt/virtual
# mhddfs /mnt/hdd1,/mnt/hdd2,/mnt/hdd3 /mnt/virtual -o allow_other
option: allow_other (1)
mhddfs: directory '/mnt/hdd1' added to list
mhddfs: directory '/mnt/hdd2' added to list
mhddfs: directory '/mnt/hdd3' added to list
mhddfs: move size limit 4294967296 bytes
mhddfs: mount point '/mnt/virtual'

The «-o allow_other» option here means that the resulting filesystem should be visible to all users, not just to the one who created it.

The result will look like this:

$ df -h
Filesystem            Size  Used Avail Use% Mounted on
...
/dev/sda1              80G   50G   30G  63% /mnt/hdd1
/dev/sdb1              40G   35G    5G  88% /mnt/hdd2
/dev/sdc1              60G   10G   50G  17% /mnt/hdd3
mhddfs                180G   95G   85G  53% /mnt/virtual

As you can see, the new filesystem has been created. It joined the total size of all drives together (180G), added together the space used by all files there (95G) and summed up the free space (85G). If you look at files in /mnt/virtual, you'll notice that it has files from all three drives, with all three directory structures «overlayed» onto each other.

But what if you try to add new files somewhere inside that /mnt/virtual? Well, that is quite tricky issue, and I must say the author of mhddfs solved it very well. When you create a new file in the virtual filesystem, mhddfs will look at the free space, which remains on each of the drives. If the first drive has enough free space, the file will be created on that first drive. Otherwise, if that drive is low on space (has less than specified by «mlimit» option of mhddfs, which defaults to 4 GB), the second drive will be used instead. If that drive is low on space too, the third drive will be used. If each drive individually has less than mlimit free space, the drive with the most free space will be chosen for new files.

It's even more than that; if a certain drive runs out of free space in the middle of a write (suppose, you tried to create a very large file on it), the write process will not fail; mhddfs will simply transfer the already written data to another drive (which has more space available) and continue the write there. All this completely transparently for to the application which writes the file (it will not even know that anything happened).

Now you can simply work with files in /mnt/virtual, not caring about what is being read from which disk, etc. Also, the convenience of having large «contiguous» free space means you can simply drop any new files into that folder and (as long as there's space on at least one member of the virtual FS) not care about which file gets stored where.

If you decide to make that mount point creating automatically for you on each boot, you can add the following line to /etc/fstab:

mhddfs#/mnt/hdd1,/mnt/hdd2,/mnt/hdd3 /mnt/virtual fuse defaults,allow_other 0 0

For more details, see man mhddfs.

The last, but not the least important thing to mention, is the fact that it's very simple to stop using mhddfs, if you later decide to do so - and not lose any file data or directory structure. Let's say, at some point in time, you purchase a new 500 GB hard disk, and want to sell the smaller disks on Ebay. You can just plug in the new drive, copy everything from /mnt/virtual onto it, and then remove mhddfs mount point and disconnect old drives. All your folders, which were previously merged in a «virtual» way by mhddfs, will now be merged in reality, on the new disk. And thanks to the fact that files themselves are not split into bits which are stored on different drives, even in the unlikely event when mhddfs suddenly no longer works for you (or disappears from existence), you can still copy all your data from all three drives into one single folder, and have the same structure you previously had in that /mnt/virtual mount point.

potrace: Transform bitmap images into vector graphics

published on Mon May 19 05:00:55 2008 in packages-news

Article submitted by András Horváth. Guess what? We still need you to submit good articles about software you like!

You can face the task sometimes that you need a high resolution material from a particular image. Most probably when you’re a graphic designer (or even a tattoo artist), you might want to have a good quality result from a low resolution image that you can magnify no matter how much, it will give you smooth edges in high quality.

For this, you have the following possibility without a trace program: using a pixel graphic software like Gimp, you can resize the image with the best resampling method and apply a selective blur filter on it. Most of the times this doesn’t give the necessary quality.

There is a small but powerful utility called potrace developed by Peter Selinger, a mathematics professor at the Dalhousie University.

With a trace program like potrace, all you have to do is to give the image as an input, and there you have the result in the standard SVG format. potrace can produce even PDF format as an output.

Command-line example:

$ potrace -s image.bmp

With this process, the program transforms the images’ pixels into filled curves that have infinite resolution with smooth lines at any zoom.

In my personal experience while working as a graphic designer, potrace gave me very good results to many input images. Compared to other high expensive proprietary software, when the input image had sharp endings, potrace gave sharp edges in the result and other programs gave bad results, curving the edges. That needed a lot of manual correction.

Pros (compared to other programs):

  • Very good results
  • Pretty fast
  • Can be easily run from a command-line
  • Can be used from the Inkscape open-source vector graphics software (Path / Trace Bitmap menu or Shift+Alt+B)

Cons:

  • Only 2 colors output (Black & White), no colored process is available yet
  • potrace does not support PNG images as an input (though images can be converted easily from PNG with a whole variety of free programs)

This is an example found in the homepage, you can see the original bitmap and the vectorised image:

Original bitmap potrace output

The package has been available both in Debian and Ubuntu since a long time ago.

Related links:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Potrace

http://wiki.inkscape.org/wiki/index.php/Potrace

Debian GNU Linux SuiteTelecentro: millions of users for the digital society every year

contributed by andremachado, published on Sun May 11 21:24:45 2008 in success-stories

Debian GNU/Linux SuiteTelecentro: millions of users for the digital society every year

The Brazilian Debian GNU / Linux SuiteTelecentro is a custom solution which is currently being deployed in the Digital Inclusion Program of Banco do Brasil. SuiteTelecentro is used in approximately 2000 telecentres and computer rooms. The Program is all across Brazil through various partners such as local communities and Non Governmental Organizations. The Program is already active at 953 cities, with more than 40,000 donated computers, 2,900 instructors trained, and more than 4 millions low-income users who benefit from the Debian GNU / Linux SuiteTelecentro and Digital Inclusion Program of Banco do Brasil each and every year.

With 668,000 total downloads at its Brazilian development site on Codigo Livre, the customized Debian GNU / Linux SuiteTelecentro is in the top 5 among the 1952 projects hosted.

The SuiteTelecentro, for use at telecentres, allows for the utilisation of older, lower performance computer hardware as terminals for LTSP servers. Through this technology, a telecentre needs only a single machine with a more up-to-date processor and more memory, where all software will be executed. The less capable ones act only as graphical interfaces.

Gilson Jardim, Issamo Kisaka and members of Free Software Digital Inclusion Team, Banco do Brasil IT Board, stated in an interview to Debian Times that the SuiteTelecentro project chose Debian GNU / Linux as its foundation because of the Debian Project commitment to Free Libre Software, and the documentation quality that allows easy customization of the Debian Installer. The main advantages of using Debian GNU / Linux for SuiteTelecentro are the easy system, packages and services installation; easy upgrade and configuration; and the inherent stability and security of the system.

The latest stable version contains the KDE graphical environment which runs over LTSP. The user remotely executes the office suite OpenOffice.org, the Firefox web browser and the Gimp (GNU Image Manipulation Program).

The SuiteTelecentro also includes the telecentre management software Ocara and its dependencies ( Apache, MySQL, PHP). Ocara was developed by the IT department of Banco do Brasil , which has already migrated 50,000 desktops and 15,000 ATMs to GNU / Linux; 90,000 OpenOffice.org installations.

The latest stable version, 1.1-7, was developed on Debian GNU / Linux 3.1 Sarge. The next version 2.0 is upcoming. As of April 2008, the Beta 10-8 version is available for download. The new features over previous stable version are:

  • Based on Debian GNU / Linux 4.0 Etch operating system.
  • LTSP 4.2
  • Gnome graphical desktop environment
  • Simplified installation process
  • MediaWiki
  • The "menu_telecentro" script, with options to create boot diskettes, enable and configure remote terminals (video, mouse, swap configurations and reconfigurations), modify MySQL passwords.

Links

http://pt.wikipedia.org/wiki/Suitetelecentro

http://sourceforge.net/projects/suitetelecentro

http://codigolivre.org.br/projects/suitetelecentro

SuiteTelecentro website

About the Debian Project

Debian GNU / Linux is one of the free libre operating systems (GNU/Linux, GNU/Hurd, GNU/NetBSD, GNU/kFreeBSD), running 18733+ officially maintained packages on platforms, from cell phones and network devices to mainframes and supercomputers, developed by more than two thousand volunteers from all over the world who collaborate via the internet on the Debian Project.

Debian's dedication to Free Libre Open Source Software, its constitutional non-profit nature, its open and meritocratic development model, organization and social governance make it a first among free libre operating system distributions.

The Debian project's key strengths are its volunteer base, its dedication to the Debian Social Contract and the Debian Constitution, and its commitment to provide the best operating systems attainable, following a strict quality policy, working with an established QA Team and helpful users reporting bugs, suggestions, exchanging ideas, and registering experiences.

You can help Debian Project without joining it and even not being a programmer, or being a development and or service partner company or institution at the Debian Partner Program, or simply making various donations to the Debian Project.

Debian Project news, press releases and press coverage can be found from the official Debian wiki page. PR contact at debian-publicity list.

kteatime - Small tray utility which reminds you of steeping tea

published on Sun May 11 05:00:42 2008 in packages-news

Article submitted by Stephan Windmüller. Guess what? We still need you to submit good articles about software you like!

For some people coffee seems to be the only liquid they drink in front of their workstation. But for those who enjoy a cup of tea once in a while, kteatime may be a neat little helper.

I expect every one of them knows this situation: The water just boiled, you put some green tea in your cup, add the water and return to your work. 15 minutes later you realize that you forgot your tea and only dozens of sugar cubes will rescue it. ;)

kteatime helps you to prevent this situation in form of a little timer in the tray.

kteatime configuration window

After selecting the appropriate kind of tea and starting the timer it will display a little circle which turns from red to green. The tooltip informs you how long your tea will need.

When your tea is ready, kteatime informs you with a beep and a little pop-up. You can also specify a command which should be run.

tea ready pop-up

For me kteatime is the only reason besides k3b to keep the KDE libraries installed. Even as a KDE application it just works fine under XFCE.

kteatime is available since Debian Sarge (perhaps even longer) and also part of every version of Ubuntu.

Debian Weekly News 2008/02

published on Fri May 9 00:00:00 2008 in weekly-news

Welcome to this year's 2nd issue of DPN, the newsletter for the Debian community. We would like to thank everyone for his feedback on the last issue of the Debian Project News! We didn't reckoned a tiny newsletter would cause such an sensation — we where even mentioned in some print magazines! So many, many thanks! We'll try our very best to come up and exceed your expectations!

Debian and Google Summer of Code

The Debian Project announced to participate again in Google Summer of Code Program. Twelve students will get the opportunity to work on different projects during their summer vacation while Google will fund them.

Development progress

The development efforts to release the next stable Debian release codenamed Lenny in September continue. While the transition to Python 2.5 as default python version is already completed, the transition to Perl 5.10 is still ongoing. So the freeze, the phase when developers will concentrate on fixing bugs instead of adding new features, will be called soon.

Debian Project Leader interviews

In two recently published interviews with the new elected Debian Project Leader, Steve McIntyre presented a bit more about the Debian Project. The interviews can be found at ZDNet, and ComputerWorld UK.

debimg, a new software to replace debian-cd

debimg is a piece of software designed to replace debian-cd. Its current feature set is very limited, but building single disks for i386 and amd64 is possible (netinst disks build in about 5 seconds). It still lacks many features like disk sets and multi-arch.

19 new Debian Developers this week: The Debian Project improves its New Maintainer process

At Friday the 18th of April 2008, 19 new Debian Developers (DD) accounts were created.

Planets for Debian Contributors up again, ready for new feeds and languages

Holger Levsen reported that after a severe hardware failure, now all local planets for Debian contributors are up again. Currently there are only English, Italian and German planets, but the guys at Debian-community.org are doing a great job and encourage new contributors to submit their feeds or request new localized planets.

Debian Project will be at Swiss Linux Days 2008

From Wednesday the 21st of May 2008 to Thursday the 22nd of May 2008, Geneva, Switzerland, Debian Project will participate with a booth at Swiss Linux Days 2008. Debian-Med will also be presented at a talk. Please see our events page for further details.

Debian Project will be at LinuxTag 2008

From Wednesday the 28th of May 2008 to Saturday the 31st of May 2008, Berlin, Germany, the Debian Project will participate with a booth at LinuxTag 2008. Please see our events page for further details.

Other news

Lior Kaplan reported, that he finished triage of over 300 bugs reported against the iceweasel / firefox packages. Of those 300 bugs only 70 are still valid for a version of firefox shipped in a Debian release.

Want to continue reading DPN?

Please help us create this newsletter. We still need more volunteer writers who watch the Debian community and report about what is going on. Please see our HOWTO contribute page to find out how to help. We're looking forward to receiving your mail at debian-publicity@lists.debian.org.

Canadian British Columbia's School District opts for Debian GNU Linux

contributed by andremachado, published on Sun May 4 14:24:45 2008 in success-stories

Canadian British Columbia's School District #73 opts for Debian GNU / Linux

Kamloops Thompson School District #73, British Columbia, Canada, with 55 elementary and secondary schools, chose a majority of open source software on Debian GNU / Linux as it is easier to maintain and in their experience offers better support.

Dean Montgomery, network support technician and programmer for District #73, stated in an interview: "In 15 minutes I can update OpenOffice[.org] on thousands of diskless workstations. This beats ghosting [proprietary Operating Systems (OS)] hard drives."

Having used other proprietary OS and Linux distributions before, in mid 2006 they moved over to Debian GNU / Linux because it is significantly easier to keep up-to-date.

"We get better support with open source software: online wiki's, forums, mailing lists, etc, are much faster and better to get support than phoning up to [a proprietary OS company] and listening to someone read off answers from flash cards."

Even older kids get their work done on Debian GNU / Linux. "Once the students see how much they can customize and tweak KDE desktop and play with Beryl 3D [(now Compiz-Fusion)] desktop, they like Debian GNU / Linux more than [proprietary OS]."

"We give everyone FreeNX access to their Debian GNU / Linux desktop from home so they can get all the same programs without having to install [Debian GNU /] Linux at home."

Montgomery believes a crucial aspect of migrating to Linux or open sourced based software is training. And that student kids learn faster than technicians, secretaries and librarians. "If you don't know how to do something in Linux - just ask the students," he advised.

Read the complete interview at this page. Watch a sample video of Debian with Compiz-Fusion.

About the Debian Project

Debian GNU / Linux is one of the free libre operating systems ( GNU/Linux, GNU/Hurd, GNU/NetBSD, GNU/kFreeBSD), running 18733+ officially maintained packages on 15 hardware platforms, from cell phones and network devices to mainframes and supercomputers, developed by more than two thousand volunteers from all over the world who collaborate via the internet on the Debian Project.

Debian's dedication to Free Libre Open Source Software, its constitutional non-profit nature, its open and meritocratic development model, organization and social governance make it a first among free libre operating system distributions.

The Debian project's key strengths are its volunteer base, its dedication to the Debian Social Contract and the Debian Constitution, and its commitment to provide the best operating systems attainable, following a strict quality policy, working with an established QA Team and helpful users reporting bugs, suggestions, exchanging ideas, and registering experiences.

You can help Debian Project without joining it and even not being a programmer, or being a development and or service partner company or institution at the Debian Partner Program, or simply making various donations to the Debian Project.

Debian Project news, press releases and press coverage can be found from the official Debian wiki page. PR contact at debian-publicity list.

cu: Simple serial communication program

published on Sun May 4 05:00:56 2008 in packages-news

Article submitted by Floris Bruynooghe. Guess what? We still need you to submit good articles about software you like!

If you have servers, embedded systems or high end routers (or old PC’s doing those jobs) chances are that they will have a console on a serial port instead of being equipped with a display and keyboard. Even when normally you use ssh(1) or similar to log in to those machines, in debugging and rescue sessions you often want to see console messages, pull down the network interface or maybe play with the boot loader (like launching alternate kernels from within grub). You then need a null modem cable (often supplied by vendors when they use RJ45 plugs for the serial console instead of RS232) to connect the serial port of your computer to the serial console of the device.

Now you also need a program, often called a “serial communications” program, that can connect to your serial port and allow you to use your terminal as the console of the attached device. Most serial communication programs however where actually made in an era when most networking happened by using a modem —attached to the serial port— to dial up other systems. As a result of this they tend to have very heavy and bloated interfaces, giving you all sort of modem-specific functionality via a complicated interactive interface. This is where cu comes in! It is a very simple version of it: a simple command line program doing the bare minimum needed.

In it’s simplest scenario, described above, invocation is trivial:

$ cu -l /dev/ttyS0

For example this is how I connect to my home router (normally I’d use apt-get over ssh though):

flub@laurie:~$ cu -l /dev/ttyS1
Connected.

Debian GNU/Linux 4.0 balder ttyS0

balder login: root
Password:
Last login: Sun Apr 13 19:58:46 2008 on ttyS0
balder:~# apt-get update
...
balder:~# apt-get upgrade
...
balder:~# logout

Debian GNU/Linux 4.0 balder ttyS0

balder login: ~.
Disconnected.
flub@laurie:~$ 

As you can see here I used the seconds serial port (ttyS1) of my local machine (laurie) to connect to the first serial port (ttyS0) of the router (balder), which is configured to run a getty on it. This allows me to log in and do any task I want just like from any other terminal. Disconnecting is done just as in ssh by default: by typing `~.‘ just after you have typed a newline.

The above will connect you to the serial line configured as 9600, 8n1 (9600 baud rate, 8 data bits, no parity, 1 stop bit). This is most likely the default setting on the device. However as this is sometimes a little slow you might want to configure your server (or whatever the device is) to use a faster baud rate, or maybe your vendor did that already and told you in their documentation what speed to use. The speed is easily changed by another command line switch:

$ cu -l /dev/ttyS0 -s 150000

If you need to change the parity this can be achieved by using -e for even and -o for odd parity. The stop bits and data bits can’t be changed by command line switches unfortunately, but needing them seems very rare.

cu does have a fair few more options and some more commands starting with the `~‘ escape character. Most of these have to do with using modems to dial other systems however and are not applicable for null modem use. The manual page, cu(1), gives a detailed description of more advanced features.

(1) If you’re unlucky enough to not have a serial port anymore, like many modern laptops, a USB-dongle with a serial port is usually assigned to /dev/ttyUSB0.

Thanks!

published on Sat May 3 05:26:14 2008 in packages-news

Hi again,

A few weeks ago, I wrote a call for help as we were lacking material for keeping the site alive. I’m very happy to say that it was a success! We received many great articles that we’re currently drafting for publication (you have already seen some), and lots of support. You people rock!

We will be keeping the weekly schedule for now, just to be on the safe side. If the contributions keep flowing, we might be able to do twice a week posts again.

So thanks to all of you: silent readers, commenters and writers. You’re great and you are the reason and life of this site!